Archive for Business

How to Start Exporting

Posted in Import/Exporting with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 9, 2013 by OC Talk Radio

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Don’t miss this two hour “Lunch and Learn” on “How To Start Exporting” put on by the LA Bar Assn and the Port of LA, Sept. 26 from noon-2pm.

$30 gets you lunch and a “crash course” on govt. programs, services and training plus a chance to meet some of the top officials from a variety of governmental and quasi-governmental agencies.

John M. Andersen, Acting Assistant Secretary, US Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration will give the Keynote Address to start this “working lunch” program.

OC Talk Radio will be there covering this event as one of several “media sponsors”.

$ 30 before September 6th.  Visit  www.legalports.com/ to sign up.

Port of Long Beach GLOBAL BIZ CONFERENCE May 3

Posted in Events with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 18, 2012 by OC Talk Radio

Interested in learning more about import/export initiatives and opportunities?  Then don’t miss the Port of Long Beach’s GLOBAL BUSINESS CONFERENCE May 3.

Meet Sr.Officials from Port of Long Beach, Homeland Security, Dept of Commerce and many other agencies along with numerous internatl trade attorneys.  $150 includes 3 separate panels, lunch and private tour of port facilities by boat.  Discounted tix available at www.OCTalkRadio.net (cuz we’re a sponsor!)

Why I Created OC Talk Radio

Posted in Internet Radio, OC Talk Radio with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 31, 2011 by OC Talk Radio

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For those intested, here’s the “backstory” of how OC Talk Radio began.

“Social media is not an ad. People don’t see your post, tweet or LinkedIn profile and buy. The purpose (and promise) of all social mediums is simply to start a conversation with someone you’d like to meet.”

I belong to a group called CRITICAL MASS FOR BUSINESS. It’s a facilitated CEO PEER GROUP that meets once a month for 4 hours. The group is limited to 12 members, all of whom own similarly sized businesses in non-competeing industries.

Our typical agenda starts with a recap of what happened to all of us over the prior month including reports on whatever we did (or didn’t do) to implement the suggestions, ideas and “action plans” from our last meeting. For many of us (me included) this “accountability to someone other than yourself” may be one of the most important features of this group. We’re all entrepreneurs, not used to reporting to anyone but ourselves. The problem with that approach (however) is that it’s far too easy to make excuses or put off painful decisions when there is no one looking over your shoulder, prodding you to improve and move forward. “I’ll do it tomorrow” too often means it never gets done.

Then comes the truly transformative part of the meeting: the “round table discussions”. Here is where the rubber meets the road and people really get to the heart of their issues. Using a strictly controlled “question and answer process” (guided by our professional facilitators) we probe, distill and digest whatever issues each member wishes to bring forward. It’s not always a pleasant experience to be on “the hot seat” but it’s always informative and often illuminating. This is the only true “no spin zone” I know. You’re in a confidential setting with 11 other struggling entrepreneurs, many of whom are wrestling with the same issues and obstacles you are. And it s the only place I know where you get really honest, no bs feed back. Who else is gonna tell you such truth? Your friends and family (who don’t want to hurt your feelings?) Your employees (who don’t want to lose their jobs?) Or some consultant (who really wants to please you and keep getting paid and whose narrow expertise may not allow them to see the whole picture?)

This is the magical “mastermind” part of the meeting: 12 individual minds coming together as one urging, adding to and otherwise improving upon each previous thought. Organized brainstorming, proving once again that the sum is greater than the individual parts. How can this help? Well, it’s hard to describe unless you’ve experienced it. But let me say that (in my own case) it gave birth to a whole new business.

I was a long time PR person whose core clients (billiards, hot tubs and other home improvement products) had seen a dramatic decline during the recent “Great Recession”. Hot tub sales alone fell by over 70%. So, one by one, my clients were either going out of business or cutting back dramatically on their overall marketing services (including me). I entered the group to find a way to revitalize my business. Instead, the group opened my eyes to a whole new business opportunity.

As I recanted my problems to the group and discussed how foolishly I’d put all my “eggs in one basket” (by narrowly focusing on just one niche), how “fat and happy” and complacent I’d become in the process and how I’d generally stopped learning, growing and aggressively marketing my services to others, it became clear that I needed a new fire or passion to prod me in a new direction and a distinctive service to offer. Then, after casually mentioning that PR companies were being asked (more and more) to take on the role and responsibilities of “social media strategist” for their clients (since ad agencies-used to making ads–and marketing people-used to collecting and analyzing data–neither knew how nor wanted to explore this new aspect of marketing), the group started prodding me to explore this subject and educate myself on this opportunity. That led to long discussions about “what is social media”, “how is it different than traditional advertising, PR and marketing” and what is its fundamental purpose?

That, in turn, led me to some remarkble insights such as “social media isn’t an ad on the Internet”. People don’t just read your blog or “tweets” and buy. Instead, its something we’ve never seen before. The purpose (and promise) of social media is that it allows you to start a conversation with anyone you want to meet, from which you can learn, explain, explore and otherwise engage them in a meaningful dialog in which (hopefully) both sides receive some benefit. That means you can’t just “ask for the order” anymore. You have to be willing to offer some ideas and information for free, upfront, before you start the sales process. Information that your audience (hopefully) will find so interesting and informative that they pass it onto others in their network and community (creating “brand advocates” or “viral marketing” for your goods or services in the process). Then you have to respond to their questions and comments and keep them coming back for more. In other words, you have to have something interesting to say and then keep saying it regularly and often.

That’s why most social media programs fail. Most companies aren’t prepared to become their own media production companies. They run of out meaningful things to say and they don’t regularly keep at it, primarly because it takes time and discipline and it may not show immediate ROI. And quite often, no one in the company is prepared to take on the additional role of “social media spokesman”, which is why it defaults to the traditional PR people (who are used to regularly speaking for their clients).

And that’s when it occurred to me. This is what I should be doing, particularly since I originally started off in radio broadcasting and communication right after college (as a traditional DJ on WMYK, “K94″, in Norfolk,Virginia). Then came the even bigger insight that “I think I know a simpler and more powerful way to do this!” For if the purpose of social media is simply to start a conversation with someone you want to meet, then what could be easier than simply calling them up, interviewing them over the phone and then streaming that conversation live to the world? You could even record, archive and store it on some server, making it available 24/7 as a download for others to listen to and enjoy later as a “podcast” on ITunes and elsewhere.

Wouldn’t that be much easier to produce than trying to research and write a new blog or mini-article each week? And (ultimately) wouldn’t it be much easier for your audience on the Internet to consume (given the fact that most people would rather watch or listen to something on the Internet than read it?) And wouldn’t these weekly live conversations be more interesting and stimulating than just talking to yourself ? (a problem that plagues most other social mediums like blogs, tweets and traditional podcasts) And wouldn’t a live, weekly broadcast, at a regular time and place, be more likely to engage your audience, particularly if they could call-in their questions (just like any traditional talk show) or log-on, in real time, and tweet their comments ? And wouldn’t your guests immediately tell all their friends, customers and clients to listen? And wouldn’t they put a link to that recorded interview up on their site after the fact (which would help drive traffic and links to your site, thereby raising your search engine rankings and giving you a free ad on their website forever?) The answer to all this was “yes”.

Thus was born a new “social medium” and the business to go with it: OC TALK RADIO, Orange County’s only community radio station giving local businesses a voice on the Internet. For more information, check us out at http://octalkradio.net.

OC Talk Radio Host Quoted in AMEX Open Forum

Posted in Critical Mass with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 6, 2010 by OC Talk Radio

Ric Franzi, co-host of CRITICAL MASS every Tuesday and Wednesday from 4-5pm PST here on http://www.OCTalkRadio.net, was recently quoted in an American Express Open Forum article called ” CEO Peer Groups: Finding Your Match.”

As a longtime professional facilitator for several monthly peer groups for business owners and executives here in Orange County, Ric was a natural inclusion in any such story. Having written the definitive guide on the subject called “Critical Mass: The 10 Explosive Powers of CEO Peer Groups” (now in its third printing on Amazon.com), Ric knows first hand the incredible effect these sessions can have on “making better, more informed decisions”.

But there are several steps which must be taken to insure that you get the most out of your peer group experience.  The most important factor (as the AMEX Open Forum article points out) is knowing who’ s in the group.

“You want to be in a group with leaders who run companies of a similar size or at the same stage of development. Insights and advice are more meaningful when they come from people running companies with the same span of control,” says Ric Franzi, who runs Critical Mass for Business here in Orange County, California, along with his partner Doug Gfeller, Past President of the International Coach Federation-OC and one of the few Master Certified Business Coaches in the country. Together, they act as the local franchise for the international Renaissance Executive Forums system. 

For more information on this transformative new process, check out www.CriticalMassforBusiness.com or become part of their free CRITICAL MASS COMMUNITY by tuning into www.OCTalkRadio.net every Tuesday and Wednesday from 4-5pm PST.  

You can read the full AMEX OPEN FORUM INTERVIEW by CLICKING HERE.